Do you always aim at right and left edge pins?

Based on current data, if you Do You Always Aim At Right and Left Edge Pins you will miss around 30% of your shots off the green.

But…if you aim for the middle of the green only 10% will be off the green!

Hummm…30% versus 10%  which would you prefer?

I’m betting your choice would be the 10%.

So why would a player aim at those edge pins?  Probably because they THINK that’s the play.

Sure, the best players in the world go flag hunting all day, but they ARE the best players in the world and they know how to control their golf ball.

But, there are times that they play away from the flag.

Why?

Because sometimes the pin is in such a location that it makes for a difficult putt so they will hit their approach shot to a location that gives them the straightest putt, or the zero line.

Now think about that.

Would you rather have a 10 footer that has 2 feet of break or a 15 footer that has NO break?

Again, the odds are in your favor with the straight one.

One of the things I constantly work on with my players is setting up their approach shots to end up at the “zero line”.

The “zero line” is the location that gives you a straight putt.

If you apply this strategy to your game you just might be surprised…and pleasantly at that!  I urge you to examine your game and see how you can drop strokes with just a few simple course management adjustments.

As the old NIKE saying goes, “Just Do It!”

It’s your game and your choices…make them wisely!

To schedule your time and to learn more about this strategy click here

Do You Always Aim At Right and Left Edge Pins

 

photo courtesy of richmondhillgolfclub

When I was a kid I had NO FEAR of putting…NONE!

Every putt I hit, if it didn’t go in the hole went 3-4 feet by and the majority of the time I made these knee-knockers coming back.

I’ll bet when YOU were a kid the same thing happened to you.

Why?

As kids we had no fear, missing wasn’t even an option.  But then something happened…

…We got older AND started missing those come-backers!

So instead of putting “freely” we started thinking about NOT 3 putting!

Lots of the worlds best players go through this, even the great Tom Watson.  In his career, he ran the ball past the hole if he didn’t make it.  Then, he started missing those come-backers and he got a little gun shy!

He eventually worked his way out of it back to the Watson we all know.

If you are always trying NOT to 3 putt I can guarantee you one thing…you’ll NEVER make anything!

The moral of the story…go back to being a kid and putt no fear!

photo courtesy of richmondhillgolfclub
photo courtesy of richmondhillgolfclub

 

 

 

 

Almost aPlayer Development Program 038ll players nowadays carry two or more wedges but very FEW of them actually know HOW to take advantage of multiple wedges.

Most players also make the same full swing with their wedges instead of using what I refer to as a “pitch” length swing.  Remember first that wedges are designed for accuracy and NOT for distance!  Poor wedge players swing these clubs just as they would with the rest of their set while good wedge players control the flight AND the distance.

Here’s an example of a “pitch” length backstroke;  the right forearm does NOT exceed horizontal to the ground, it can be lower but never higher. By keeping the backstroke the same length and varying the finish you can achieve three different trajectories and distances. Each of these finish locations can also be used while simply changing the club shaft location at Impact.  For a lower trajectory have the club shaft leaning forward , a higher trajectory would a vertical club shaft at Impact and for the highest trajectory a slightly backward leaning club shaft. Also remember that any shot that is NOT full but more than a “chip shot” is a pitch shot.  Unfortunately most golf announcers tell us that the player is “chipping” when they are 30 yards off the green!  That is NOT a chip shot!  It is a pitch shot…just like a greenside bunker, or a lob these are all variations of pitching. For more information on how you can be in control of your short game visit us at Improve My Shortgame.